Summer hikes and Fall radio

Elbow Falls, 1897 (credit: Mountain Legacy Project)

This week, you may have heard my latest piece on CBC Radio One’s Spark — a little doc recorded in Kananaskis Country on a hike in August. It’s all about the Mountain Legacy Project — a group that recreates photographs from the original surveys of the Rockies to help track changes in the area.

Sure, it’s neat to compare these photos to what used to be — but there are a lot of practical uses for them, too. You can hear them all right here.

New year, new radio gig

Meg at CKUA (with cardboard Baba watching!)Happy to share that I’m back in the booth at CKUA! A year and a half-ish after producing and hosting The Label (the back story and back catalogue of your favourite imprints), it’s such a joy to be back spinning tunes and being a part of one of my favourite stations (even when Cardboard Baba is lurking behind me!)

You can hear me broadcast live from the Calgary Foundation studio on Tuesday nights from 6-8 p.m. MT for How I Hear It. Filling in for the incomparable Monica Miller means you’ll hear a little bit of everything, from the latest indie chart-toppers to jazz classics, world beats, roots, blues, folk… and, of course, a healthy dose of your favourite (and soon-to-be-favourite) Canadian artists!

You can stream the show live at CKUA.com.

When one lives above the only post office in town…

Mark and Tejas at Iqaluit’s post office with their Amazon bounty.

… one tends to notice what people are coming and going with! And that’s what inspired my latest story for Spark on CBC Radio One. It’s all about how Iqalummiut are using Amazon Prime to offset the high costs of living in the North.

You can see some photos and listen to the story here.

It was a wonderful summer in Iqaluit, reading the news and doing some reporting for CBC Nunavut. But for now, I’m back in Calgary for a new year teaching at Mount Royal University and starting some new podcasting projects… updates soon!

 

History, Home Economics and Hot Cross Buns

This week, my radio documentary airs on CBC Radio One’s The Doc Project! The Science of Everyday Life is about the women of ATCO’s Blue Flame Kitchen — the only home service department still based out of a  North American utility company.

While the Kitchen is now the only one around, home service departments used to be the standard for many if not most companies, from department stores to utility providers. In this doc, I delve deep in to the history of the Blue Flame Kitchen’s 85 years of service and try to figure out how this one has survived — and what that means for the people who use it. Oh, and I eat a lot of delicious baked goods!

You can listen to The Science of Everyday Life here.